Writing with Distractions: When the “Real World” Screws Your Creativity

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      If you’re anything like me, writing during the summer months can feel particularly challenging. Between the warm weather and all of the opportunities to socialize, finding the time to sit down and write can feel like climbing a mountain. Imagine this: you’re on a crowded bus or in the middle of a social event when inspiration suddenly strikes you. This person would make a great anti-hero, or perhaps this setting would be perfect for that one scene in that one story you’re working on. You end up shifting in your seat, biting your nails anxiously waiting for this to finally be over, waiting for the ability to make it back to your journal/laptop/typewriter to start bringing your ideas to life. You race home, full of excitement and inspiration…

…only to remember you live with your children/roommates/spouse, or you left the dishes in the sink in your hurry to leave earlier, or there’s just too much background noise and distraction for you to focus on actually honing your craft. Believe me, I get it. As I write this, there are little squeals and shrieks filling my home as the children play. Later tonight, my partner will be home excited to discuss the events of his day, regardless of what I seem to be working on. Our two fur-babies seem to have the most interest in cuddling on my lap when I’ve opened up my laptop to do something productive. Every few minutes, my focus will be torn away by a cry for mommy, or a cat attempting to climb across the keys, or the occasional loud conversation from the neighbors above us.

      All of this is, of course, an attempt to pretend I don’t get distracted by social media surfing and memes.

      So, what’s a writer to do living in a world full of distractions? Do we stifle the creative thinking in an attempt to be more present and engaged with our surroundings? Do we do our best to remember our ideas and place them on a back-burner until we finally find some time for ourselves? (Okay, seriously, if your life is anything like mine I do not advocate that last idea; you’ll never write anything down but ideas.) How can you tune out the sights and sounds of your environment long enough to accomplish your writing goals? Well, friends, buckle up, because I’m about to tell you how to get away with writing through distractions, otherwise known as making crazy creativity look normal.

      The first suggestion would be to try to limit your distractions. If you’re anything like me, you just read that last line and snorted, possibly even rolling your eyes. Don’t worry, I get it. It’s not like you can just send the kids off for a month long camping trip in the woods, or teach the dog how to use the toilet like everyone else. Distractions are going to happen, no doubt about it, and you can’t always turn your back on them or tune them out. However, not every distraction is unavoidable, or life and death in that moment. Don’t be afraid to tell your family, “Hey, I’ve got some work to do tonight, so I’ll be in my room/office/special chair for a while. Please only bother me if someone is literally dying.” Do your best to ask for support where you need it and limit the number of times someone breaks your concentration to ask for an extra juice box.

      If you notice you’re still struggling to focus even when you finally manage to lock yourself away for a bit of alone time, don’t be timid about switching up your rituals and routine to discover why. I once knew a girl who used music to help her fall into her “creativity zone.” She would spend hours building playlists of music she thought she’d enjoy writing to. Most of the time, however, she would then find herself tabbing out of her writing software to skip or change songs she found distracting. Eventually, she realized she was spending more time and focus on creating her writing playlists and finding acceptable tunes than she actually was writing. She switched over to listening to electronica (is it still called that? Pretty sure that’s still what the kids are calling it) while working, and her productivity has never been higher. When I asked her why, she laughed and told me, “Since I don’t listen to this stuff in my car or for fun or whatever, I don’t really have an attachment to what song plays next. When I’m in my zone and focused, it all honestly sounds the same to me.” While serious amounts of bass and auto-tune may not be the magic solution to improving your concentration, making small changes to your routine can help you cut out unnecessary distractions and time-wasters, an invaluable action when free time can be so difficult to come by in the first place.

      If Facebook and Twitter seem to be more your weakness, you’re not alone in that either. Social media has become one of the easiest ways to keep in touch with friends and network, but it can also present a major source of inattention for many of us hoping to be productive on the internet. Just “checking in” or “reading this one article really quickly” can quickly turn into two hours spent browsing memes and replying to comments, only to realize you’re out of time and you’ve written little besides your name on the page. The easiest answer? Shut that shit down. Close out all of your internet browser tabs before even opening your Word document; you’ll thank yourself later. Does that require a bit more willpower than you’re capable of? No worries, thanks to living in the age of technology, there are tons of apps and software available to help writers focus and limit distractions. While Microsoft Word may be the most familiar and easiest to use for most new writers, software such as Scrivener and Ulysses help writers limit distractions while fully engaging in the creation of their story (if figuring out the software itself doesn’t pose too much of a distraction!). Full-screening your word processing software can help minimize webpages and apps in the background just begging for your attention.

      Visual clutter can be as much of a distraction as having a three-year-old in your lap enthusiastically blabbing on about the bird they just drew. For me, nothing kills my motivation and creativity quite as quickly as slipping into my office, only to notice the empty cups piled on the desk or the pile of little papers all over the room I’ve scribbled notes on. While it can be tempting to start organizing that pile of sticky notes or washing the dishes before they pile up, don’t. Trust me. Just find a way to shove them out of your line of vision for now. I promise, that trash will still be waiting for you later when your house is too unsettled to concentrate on writing. If you’re anything like me, tidying up this one little thing will somehow turn into hours spent rearranging and cleaning your house, and while your office might shine you’ll have little else to show for it.

      But what about those times when writing is just not an option? Is there a way to continue working on your craft while supervising the small children with paint at the kitchen table? Well…yes and no. For me personally, there is no way I can focus on developing my plot or characters while the kids are climbing all over me. I’ve tried countless times throughout the years, but little people have a talent for demanding the majority of your focus and attention while they’re up and about. However, this doesn’t mean I have to put all of my creativity to rest until bed time rolls around. Instead, I find other ways to work on my story, things that require less focus and concentration than the actual writing part. Sure, I may not be able to churn out my quick-paced action scene while cooking dinner for the family, but I can use that time for researching parts of my story I need more information to write, or doing lesser character-development exercises. Occasionally, I can even accomplish my first round of edits and cuts while attending a tea party with Barbie and her friends. I’m not saying it’s easy, but I am saying it’s possible.

      In the end, you have to want it badly enough to make it work and find a way to juggle your work/life balance (or, in the case of many writers, work/work/life) that leaves enough time to perfect your craft distraction-free. You have to be willing to turn off the television, or tell your friend “not today” from time to time. Until we find a way to transport writers and artistic types to another planet to do their work distraction-free, one of the most challenging parts of writing will always be finding a way to squish time for your passion in with the rest of your life. While there are days it might all seem impossible, believe me when I say it CAN be done.

It just might require an extra couple of cups of coffee.